RISK! Podcast
  • Episode:#637
  • Date:June 08, 2015
  • Run Time:46:36
  • Download: MP3

Boyhood

Wonder Dave, Ray Christian, and David Crabb share tales of times before they were men.

Song: RISK! Theme by Wormburner and John Sondericker

Song: Nous Aimons Oui by Otis Fodder

Live Story: Bed Head by Wonder Dave

Song: I Love My Bed by Dan Tyler

Live Story: The Hole by Ray Christian

Song: Way Down in the Hole (Live) by Tom Waits

Live Story: The Kiss by David Crabb

Song: Nobody’s Empire by Belle and Sebastian

4 Comments

  1. David Crabb’s story was really obnoxious and mean-spirited. You should have “Pam” on to tell her story of the time she kissed a boy who grew up to be an insufferable asshole.

  2. I can’t agree with the former posters comment more. I saw David Crabb at a Moth show live he was the MC and he told the same story about the poor girl with the braces. I thought it was mean then, and I think it is mean now, and not to mention redundant. I think Risk is a kind and open show for the most part, however I am disappointed that you would choose to air this.

  3. You know, part of telling a story is you get to tell it your way because it’s your story. David Crabbe is human and not obligated to love every human being he’s ever met, nor enjoy every experience he’s ever had. It’s not a nice thing to say, but there are people in the world who are irredeemably gross. I’ve met one or two in my lifetime and encounters with them tend to leave a scar.

    Besides, he’s publicizing for his new book so that means it’s time to dig up every story he’s ever told.

    On an entirely different note, glad to see Ray Christian back on the show.

  4. @De, Part of listening to a storyteller is that you get to form an opinion of them based on the content of their story and how they choose to tell it. Being “scarred” by an encounter with an “irredeemably gross” person is one thing, choosing to get on stage and ridicule that person ad nauseum is another. Keep in mind that this is a real person who would likely know that it was about her based on the context provided. The story was petty and cruel, and his performance was pompous and gleefully insensitive.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *